OpenStack Summit Barcelona 2016

OpenStack Summit in Barcelona is now officially over. The Summit happened between October 25 and 28th in Barcelona, Spain. This being my first Summit, I was excited about what to see and who I would meet during the conference 4 days. The fact that I had the chance to deliver two presentations alongside my team members. Since this was _the_ OpenStack Summit, we could not go on without, well having OpenStack, so we brought one own.
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Trash dumping: Finding jewels in the sea of waste

Trash dumping. Unlikely to be your Sunday morning plan (or Saturday evening for that mater), could bring you back something of interest. In my case, my experience is a two-fold, one in the physical world and another in the digital. Although what I’m about to tell you is more of a parable, I did not literally had to dump into any trash to find anything useful, the outcome was positive: In both cases, I did get something valuable out of it.
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Export OVF template failure on ESXi 6

For some reason, when trying to export a VM as an OVF file or OVA I keep getting the following error on VCSA 6: After going through the forums I found the answer here: https://communities.vmware.com/thread/518369?start=0&tstart=0 Essentially, you need to add the the VCSA IP address and hostname to the hosts file on the computer that you are connecting to the VCSA, such as your laptop or workstation. (/etc/hosts on *NIX or C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc on Windows).
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OpenStack Images default users

After chasing this information too often, I’ve decided to give a break to my brain and compile a list of the most common OpenStack Images (at least for my day-to-day activities). Without further ado, here’s the list: Distribution Default User Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty ubuntu CentOS 6⁄7 centos Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6⁄7 cloud-user CirrOS cirros Debian admin A complete and up to date list can be found at the OpenStack site.
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Paradox of (a computer) Choice

How many boots can you count? “choose less and feel better.” ― Barry Schwartz, The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less Yes, Dr. Schwartz could’vent said better. On his book, “The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less”, Dr. Schwartz dissects the minutia behind the decision making machine, our brain, and the challenges that we face today, in a time and age cluttered with information, options and choices.
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